Tuesday, March 31, 2009

Indians and Revolutionary Soldiers

A couple of weekends ago I drove across the nearby Ohio River to Marietta, Ohio. It is only about a forty-five minute drive from where I live. While there I visited the Conus Mound at the center of Mound Cemetery. This mound is said to have been built between 800BC and 100AD. When you begin to realize it more than likely was built before the birth of Christ it becomes a little overwhelming as you stand in its presence. This mound was supposedly built to be the burial place of Chieftains. It is encircled by a dry moat that seperates it from the surrounding cemetery.
This is a Revolutionary War Soldiers' Memorial near the foot of the mound. The soldiers are noted with Memorial Metal Stars. There are more than 25 Revolutionary War Soldiers buried in Mound Cemetery which is reportedly home to the largest number of American Revolutionary War officers buried in one location. The earliest of these soldiers was buried in 1739.
One soldier buried was Commodore Abraham Whipple - an American revolutionary naval commander. He sunk the first British ship of the American Revolution, the British schooner HMS Gaspee. After the war, it was Whipple who, as a merchant marine commander, first unfurled our American flag in London.
There is also a monument erected by the Daughters of the American Revolution in honor of those unknown soldiers buried in the cemetery.
Ancient Indians, pioneers, and modern Americans rest peacefully side-by-side.

17 comments:

quilly said...

I love to stand where history was made! Though it does tend to make me feel tiny and insignificant.

Thom said...

One of the best things and how fortunate people are back on the east coast, or around that area, is the fact that's where this country started and there is sooooo much history back there. Not saying history isn't all over but to see items like you showed in today's post is excellent. Mahalo

Rose said...

Oh, my Carletta! Did you hear ghosts whispering? Places like this sure make one stop and think.

Nessa said...

We sometimes forget that we have ancient history in this country too.

Melli said...

Isn't that amazing. Thank you for sharing this... I would certainly NEVER have known it's existence without you! WE are fortunate to have so much history on our side, aren't we?

fishing guy said...

Carletta: Very nicely posted of an interesting place.

ramblingwoods.com said...

I too love historical places and always am in awe of what was created before we had all the tools to use...

ramblingwoods.com said...

I wanted to let you know that robins are actually looking when they cock their heads. They are looking for little holes that worms make. It was an experiment done that I read about on Journey North because I thought they were listening too. ...

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Twisted Fencepost said...

Very interesting post, Carletta. I was always amazed, as a child, by the indian mound in South Charleston.

Dr.John said...

Ah! The peace of the graveyard.

PTA Transit Authority said...

Congratutlations on being choosen a "Blog of Note"

George Townboy said...

Nice post, Carletta. I wonder what secrets the Mound holds.

danelba hiraldo said...

i like the picture of the flags you taken.

Mr. Llar said...

Nice that the burial mound has been left, let's hope, uninterrupted. Wonder if that says something about initial good relations between the natives and settlers? Would like to see it one day.

Janet, said...

I love Indian mounds, too. I've been past the one in South Charleston many times. History intrigues me. I'd like to be a time traveler for one day and visit the past.

Anonymous said...

Hi Carletta,

This is whitney, derek's girlfriend. Your pictures are amazing. I really enjoyed reading the little paragraphs about them. There are different parts of history i like learning about. This is a really neat site.