Wednesday, August 27, 2008

Bridging the Gap - A Photo Challenge


This is looking through an old historic rotating B&O Railroad bridge that crosses the Muskingum River where it joins the Ohio River here in nearby Marietta, Ohio. It was built in 1859. If you look closely you can see where the rails have been removed from the tracks. I took a walk across the Harmar Pedestrian Bridge that links the downtown shopping area with Historic Harmar Village. The village is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. This was where Fort Harmar was established in 1785 as a garrison for U.S. soldiers. Today it’s a neighborhood of brick streets (seven miles of original brick streets – more than any other Ohio town) and quaint buildings housing crafts and antique shops, and a few museums.


A view underneath...

(The piers of the bridge are 150 years old.)
A view of the top of one of the piers...
A view over the side looking down....
After walking across the pedestrian portion of the bridge I turned and this is looking back to the historic Village of Harmar. Community members adorn the bridge with hanging baskets of flowers.

I hope you enjoyed my walking tour of this old historic bridge.

Alice is our host for Bridging The Gap. Click on the icon at the top of my post to check out her blog and all the 'rules' for the meme as well as links to others posting photos of bridges and participating in the challenge this week.

22 comments:

quilly said...

I very much enjoyed our walking tour of the bridge. Thank you. I was going to tell you that as kids, my cousins and I had a favorite swimming hole under an old out of service trestle bridge. I was going to ask if anyone ever jumped from your bridge to swim in the water -- but I saw that water and I think I know the answer!

Judi~Gmj said...

Oh Carletta, that first picture is what nightmares are . I am so afraid of bridges it's not even funny. My mantra to cross a bridge is puke, puke, puke... And one like this. oh for goodness sakes that is beyond sweaty palms and flipping tummys. You are so brave!!

Robert said...

I love the angle of the first shot. Normally I dont like straight on but this really shows great depth. Fun shot. And thanks for the history too.

Gattina said...

That's a very interesting old bridge !

jientje said...

I did enjoy that walk, oh yes!! What a beautiful bridge, I love how you show us pictures from all these different angles!

Hootin' Anni said...

Ewwwwwwwwwww, spooky. My bridging the gap photo today is also of iron...I have a phobia of these kinds of bridges. LOL

Love the history lesson. Thanks for sharing that with me...that's way cool.

My bridge photo for the bridging the gap challenge is also a Wordless Wednesday [so the explanation is in the 1st comment in the comment section so it will be 'wordless' on the photo.]

Happy Wednesday to you

The Texican said...

I love old, and old bridges are among my favorites. Thanks for sharing your wonderful photos. Pappy

fishing guy said...

Carletta: That photo does remind me of the many railroad bridges I crossed to get to a fishing hole. I love that they decorated the bridge with flowers.

Melli said...

Do you ALWAYS collect so much info about bridges you visit - or did you do this just for this hunt? Just wondering... This is a neat bridge!

Raven said...

Wonderful tour. Nice walking along with you because you take great pictures and you always have so much history and information to share.

Carletta said...

Melli,
Girl, haven't you been reading my blog for some time now!! :)
Whenever I post a photo of significance I ALWAYS include some facts for those inquiring minds that want to know.

Janice Thomson said...

What a wonderful old bridge - and a delightful tour of it. I'm most impressed that the community keeps it decorated with flowers. Awesome photos Carletta.

Carver said...

This was a fascinating tour. I enjoyed it very much.

I'm with you when you said on my blog that you were looking forward to fall. Even though it won't be fall for months in the NC piedmont where I live, that's part of why I posted a fall bridge mnt. trip shot as well as changed my blogs header. I am ready for fall!

juliana said...

another stunning bridge! i love the construction and the piers and the shadows in the side shot.
great offering, carletta!

ellen b said...

I really did enjoy this walking tour of this bridge! Very cool...

the teach said...

This interesting even romantic bridge puts my modern, gargantuan bridges to shame, Carletta! Love your pix! :)

peppylady said...

I almost did one about our railroad bridge that went across our Kootenai River and it actual stood longer then what we drove our rigs over.
But one day a fright train was going over and it collapse into the river.
No one was hurt.

Thank you for stopping in and the coffee is always on.

Gramma L said...

Bridges are a great thing. It would definitely be hard to get around without them. Beautiful pictures.

Rose said...

I sure enjoyed this--I love that they have the hanging baskets. Isn't it amazing that the piers have lasted 150 years...I love little bits of history like this.

Alice - I Was Born2Cree8 said...

Carletta, these are fantastic!! The first glance I got, I thought "old railway bridge" and somehow felt an emotional connection. Maybe because my Dad was a railroader, I'm not sure. All these are terrific photos. I love the flower pots along the bridge in the bottom photo.

Reba @ Reba's Run said...

Whoof!! I really like these piktures of the bridge too. I wish I had words that Mom didn't already use to tell how nice they are. Bark. Arf, arf, arf.

Minkydo said...

What a neat historical bridge. What's neater is that you have a pedestrian lane. Thanks for sharing.